Things I have done today (and every other day for the past seven years)

Welcome to the March 2015 Carnival of Natural Parenting: Day in the Life

This post was written for inclusion in the monthly Carnival of Natural Parenting hosted by Hobo Mama and Code Name: Mama. This month our participants have given us a special glimpse into their everyday.

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Things I have done today: 26th February 2015

 

  1. Wake and breastfeed my son.

 

  1. Persuade my sleepy daughter to get dressed and ready for school.

 

  1. Throw on some clothes over my own pyjamas.

 

  1. Take my daughter (whilst carrying sleepy son – still in his pyjamas) to school. Cuddles and kisses all round as we wave her off.

 

  1. Come home and eat some breakfast in the kitchen while helping my son, J to make a big tower from boxes of tea on one of the counters. I pass the boxes back to him when they topple over.

 

  1. Sit at our art table and begin to draw. J sits beside me and organizes his pencils. He tells me that I should put more colour into my drawing. He draws a picture too and we (mostly) swap compliments!
Our art area, photo by Marija Smits

Our art area, photo by Marija Smits

  1. J then wants his ‘plano’ (a tinny-sounding electronic keyboard). We hunt for the plano (even going into the attic to have a look) but there’s no plano. We phone daddy who is at work. He tells us it may be hidden in the kitchen. We find the plano!

 

  1. I start to clean the bathroom (it desperately needs doing!). J plays his plano. I hope that this will keep him busy for a bit but it doesn’t. He soon wants to do some baking, and so he goes downstairs. It is quiet as I scrub the inside of the shower and take out gunky bits of goo with a pair of tweezers. Note to self: clean the tweezers before I use them on my eyebrows.

 

  1. It is too quiet. I ask J what’s going on. ‘Sorry mummy, I made a mess.’ I go downstairs and discover a ‘semolina soup’ in a Tupperware container. There is semolina on the table and the floor. It’s not too bad. I’ve seen worse. We clear up the spilt semolina and my young scientist/chef says he wants to add baked beans to his soup. He gets out a tin and I help him add JUST THE ONE SPOON.

 

  1. I help J to cook his semolina soup in the microwave. He’s adamant that it’ll be delicious. He eats a spoonful and then says it’s too hot. He goes off to make a ‘shop’ in the lounge. I go back to cleaning the bathroom, and occasionally encourage him to come up and help me.

 

  1. I try to have a shower, but J says he now wants to play with me. I get all huffy and a bit shouty – I’m feeling grubby and I want that shower! Then I feel bad and help him to build a slide out of beds. I remember to cut myself some slack: Hey, I’m doing all right! Before I enter the shower I see J playing with some blocks. The slide’s already got boring.

 

  1. Have a shower, get dressed. J goes downstairs while I dress. It goes quiet again. I go downstairs and discover black paint all over the art area desk. A big bouncy ball is sitting in the black paint, dripping with paint. I do my best to clean the desk and J. We then go to the kitchen and cook scrambled eggs and beans. J helps me with cracking the eggs into the frying pan. He even stirs them about with a fork.

 

  1. We eat our lunch and then J goes off to play by himself. I tell him that I’m taking him to pre-school soon and so I try dressing him. I try but it’s not happening. He says he doesn’t want to go to pre-school and I end up chasing him around the dining table, looping around it about 20 times. I’m puffed out and I realize that we’re evenly matched in this race. I use my mama strength and start to block him in a corner by moving the dining table. He realizes that I’ve got him now, so we talk constructively about how I can help him settle in pre-school.

 

  1. I give him a quick feed and then we go to pre-school and J is happy. He’s really involved in the counting they’re all doing and although I tell him a few times that I’m going now he doesn’t take any notice of me.

 

  1. I go home, slightly worried that J may be unsettled when he realizes that I’m no longer there. I make a strong coffee, worry a little more, then focus on the work at hand: answering emails and editing a short story. I’m a little surprised and disappointed at how little I get done in 2 hours.

 

  1. I pick up J who is happy, but then I ask the careworker how he was, and apparently he was upset for a minute or two when he’d realized I’d gone and he’d forgotten to say goodbye. He was okay soon enough though, she says, but still, I feel bad. I try to mentally give myself a hug (while giving him lots of hugs course!).

 

  1. We go home (it’s not far) switch on the telly, watch it for 5 minutes and then go back out to school to pick up my daughter.

 

  1. And then it’s snacks and swimming… When they’re both in the water I get out my note book and write for a tiny bit. Then it’s back to running after my son, whose lesson has finished. He has taken off his swimming trunks and is running into the shower. I get wet as I walk into the public showers in order to persuade him to put his trunks back on. My daughter looks on and giggles. They stay in the shower for as long as they want (well, until all the other kids have gone) and then I manage to grab a big changing room for all three of us and J has a quick feed as I’m getting him dressed.
J and I, photo by Marija Smits

J and I, photo by Marija Smits

  1. Shopping with the kids – always a bit fraught, and then home again, to a bit of social media while they watch telly, and then cooking. My husband comes home, tired and weary, and we eat together, sharing the highlights of our day.

 

  1. I help J build a machine (gluing and sticking cardboard and then painting) while trying to get a tiny bit more of my drawing done. My daughter, R does her homework with her dad.

 

  1. Then it’s bedtime shenanigans, with books to be read, ‘sneaky’ snacks to be eaten… Sandwiches for tomorrow to be made. Teeth to be brushed over and over…

 

  1. By 10 p.m. J is finally asleep. I read for a bit, then make my husband and myself a cup of tea (he’s working on his computer) and I spend an hour working.

 

  1. Another cup of tea and then I write when everyone else is in bed and fast asleep. I lose myself to the world I’m building in my head, and finally go to bed at around 1 a.m. beside my four-year-old son. I feel incredibly grateful to still be able to snuggle up next to him. It won’t be long until he’ll want his own room like his sister (although she does still love to snuggle with her mummy). My mind returns to the book I’m writing and slowly… my thoughts become dreams.

 

  1. J wakes and stirs. I feed him back to sleep and then doze off myself.

 

Blue Moon, by Marija Smits

Blue Moon, by Marija Smits (the pretty-much finished version of the drawing I started on the day I wrote about). I think J still thinks there should be more colour in it!

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Carnival of Natural Parenting -- Hobo Mama and Code Name: MamaVisit Hobo Mama and Code Name: Mama to find out how you can participate in the next Carnival of Natural Parenting!

Please take time to read the submissions by the other carnival participants:

(This list will be updated by afternoon March 10 with all the carnival links.)

Alternative Valentine images

I know that some people really hate Saint Valentine’s Day and some people really love it. I have to say that I quite enjoy it – for me, nowadays, it brings a much-needed injection of colour in a month that is often grey weather-wise.

However, I’m really not into most of the commercial Valentine goo out there, and thought it would be fun to share a couple of ‘alternative’ Valentine images in case anyone was in need of a something bit different.

So here goes…

First up we have some very groovy monsters thanks to the artwork print-outs generously shared by Busy Mockingbird. (My kids, aged 4 and 7, really enjoyed colouring in these dudes. We could have given the monsters lollipops to hold – hence the ‘sucka’ bit, but we didn’t have any because we try our best to keep sweets out of our kitchen cupboards. Anyway, the lolly stick was just as much fun to add.)

JB & RB valentine monsters

JB & RB valentine monsters

 

Then I couldn’t resist drawing some slugs. Why? I don’t know. Just ‘because’! ;-)

Slugs in love, by Marija Smits

Slugs in love, by Marija Smits

 

And finally, if you like the idea of a more romantic image, but without too much goo, there’s this:

Red heart zentangle, by Marija Smits

Red heart zentangle, by Marija Smits

 

I drew this a couple of days ago, with my little boy beside me, eager to join in. Some paint and paper of his own * just* about kept him distracted for long enough for me to be able to finish this. It was then gifted to my husband, who very rarely gets any artwork from me. I hope it’s a pleasing-to-look-at reminder of how the romantic love between us is the invisible glue that helps to keep this whole crazy family together. :-)

And I was humbled… (my writing epiphany)

The other day I had one of those moments – an epiphany, if you like – where I could actually see where I was along my own personal writing journey. It wasn’t a ‘hooray’ epiphany – more of a slow-hand-clap one – because always in retrospect one can’t help thinking Why didn’t I know this already?

Anyway… the point is that I don’t think of myself as a novice writer. I’ve been writing for most of my life, on and off, and pretty seriously for about the last seven years. Like many an HSP when I go about learning a new skill I do it seriously, which means that I learn from a book and then do the work, methodically, pedantically (and yes, slowly).

When I began seriously writing poetry about five years ago I very quickly came to the realization that I really knew nothing about metre, form, style, rhythm. I had to correct this, so I did some research on books about writing poetry and began the work. Thankfully, I discovered Stephen Fry’s excellent The Ode Less Travelled, so the learning and the ‘work’ – as such – were a pure joy. So poetry-wise… I’m a little more confident of myself.

Yet when it comes to prose I haven’t really done the work. I HAVE been practising though and because I’ve had a few successes and publications I guessed that I could (in the main) ‘do’ article writing and fiction.

So when a short story I’d written a while ago was torn to shreds (okay, I’m exaggerating here, but I’m doing it for dramatic effect) by my editor-pal (okay, he’s not an editor-pal, he’s my very kind husband, but really, he is one of the best editors I know!) I was pretty crestfallen (a sobbing wreck). Again, it’s an HSP thing… I get very upset by criticism (even when I know it’s sound) because I find it difficult to separate my personal worth from the words that I’ve crafted.

But… I’m working on this. And because we *try* our very best to communicate well with each other, everyone in my family knows that it’s okay to have (and show) these feelings of upset… but that afterwards we move on and try to learn from what has happened.

So, here was the epiphany: I have to do the work when it comes to writing fiction. Yes, my story was written a long while ago, so I know I’ve improved since then, but I had edited it only recently, and clearly, none of the story’s faults presented itself to me then.

What I have to do is this: learn to read more critically as a reader, and really take the time to learn more about creating believable characters, POV, use of tense, flow, plotting etc. I’ve been running on instinct up until now (and it’s served me well enough, I might add) but now is the time to DO THE WORK. Thankfully, the fantastic Emma Darwin has a great list of books about the craft of writing fiction (and because of the aforesaid wonderful husband/editor-pal we already have some of these books – I’ve just not got around to reading them as yet. SILLY ME!)

So, at last, I can see where I am on my writing journey. I thought I was getting closer and closer to the top of my getting-better-at-writing mountain. In fact, I’m pretty much at the foothills and there’s a huge way to go. It’s pretty sobering, this realization, and somewhat upsetting, but you know what, it’s okay. I’m thankful that I’ve at least got to where I am now, having learned lots on the way, and when I get too blue, my wonderful family and very sweet children always cheer me up.

Coming back from my son’s gymnastics class the other day (he’s four and has recently started going to his own ‘big boy class’) my mind was full of “woe is me, my life is so grey at the moment” thoughts, but as I carried him to the car he looked about us and said, ‘Ah… look at the birds in the air, the beautiful trees and smell the fresh, good air. Ah… that’s the life.’ And I couldn’t help but think that here, in my arms, was a great philosopher. And I was humbled. :-)

 

p.s. since writing this blog post I’ve also had an experienced poet critique some of my poems. Again, it’s been sobering… and it looks as though I’ve got to go back to the poetry drawing board too. And as I’ve just been through a painful tooth extraction (of a molar which had already had root canal work done on it) I’m going to take a little time out from this writing malarkey and just focus on the things that will help me to heal, both physically and spiritually!

 

Extracted molar by Marija Smits

Extracted molar by Marija Smits

 

Looking back, looking forward

Okay, so this won’t be a stunningly original post, but I still feel it’s necessary.

I look back at 2014 and words like ‘overwhelming’, ‘upsetting’ and ‘super-busy’ come to mind (all mainly with negative connotations) as I struggled to come to the decision to let go of my involvement with the charity La Leche League and focus all my energies on my family and work. My son started pre-school (a few sessions a week) and that proved a challenge. My daughter’s adjustment to her new school year proved (and still proves) a challenge. Finding time to unwind and chat to my husband at the end of a long, tiring day was challenging too as work and the needs of our children seemed to fill every available moment. Financial burdens weighed down both our shoulders.

Yet words like ‘enriching’, ‘friendship’ and ‘creative’ spring to mind too as I recall the inspiring books I read last year; the wonderful chats I had with my friend Helen and my artistic and literary endeavours which brought fruit (spiritual and financial).

2014 was also the year I got old. I don’t mean this in a vain way – anyone who sees me on a daily basis knows that ‘I dress down’ most days. (My husband and children tease me and affectionately call me a ‘bag lady’. Actually, on reflection, I think that’s a bit offensive to bag ladies who I think are very vintage chic!) What I mean is that I actually took note of the bags under my eyes and deep frown lines. I don’t really have any issue with them, the point is that I noticed that they are now there on a permanent basis. Although, when I smile they (mainly) seem to dissolve…

2014 was the year I started to run an art club at the local school. It was also the year that I received several commissions for illustrations. It was the year I fell in love with Zentangling and felt a deep urge to create with pencil or paint nearly every day. I felt (and still feel) a real sense of gratitude for the fact that some of my art resonates with some people.

Zentangle lady with heart necklace by Marija Smits

Zentangle lady with heart necklace by Marija Smits, inspired by the poem ‘Jet Heart’ by Angela Topping

 

2014 was the year that I made myself focus more on the positivity of saying ‘no’. To ensure I got a little time to write or paint I had to say ‘no’ to something or someone. I reminded myself that it was a powerful ‘yes’ to myself.

As I look forward into 2015, inevitably, I see much (in the way of challenges) that will continue on from 2014, yet I sincerely do hope that the benefits will journey alongside the challenges bringing sunshine too. And anyway, if there are rough patches to negotiate there will always be Morecambe and Wise…  :-)

 

Eric Morecambe and Ernie Wise

Eric Morecambe and Ernie Wise

 

Wishing you all a healthy, happy and prosperous 2015!

The Mentor’s Journey (Interlude)

Having just now come to an end of a period of mentorship I am taking a break. I am in an ‘interlude’.

For the past year I’ve been a mentor to a wonderful woman. The year before that I mentored another remarkable woman. Without going into too much detail, I wanted to write about what being a mentor meant to me, and to share my thoughts on what happens now.

For me, being a mentor was a sometimes intense and challenging experience in that it made me think a lot about communication, psychology, societal judgement and what it means to be a mother. Big stuff! It was also incredibly rewarding to see my mentees learning so much, and I learnt a good deal about myself. (It once again confirmed for me my high-sensitivity — I worried a lot about being the best mentor I could be. I worried about getting stuff wrong. I worried about the paperwork details… You get the picture.)

Now that I am no longer a mentor I feel a strange mix of feelings. In some ways I feel relieved (they did it! I did it! Hooray!) and also I feel sad that I won’t be seeing these wonderful women as often as I did before. With many experiences in life there is this same mix of ‘bittersweet’, but try as I might I couldn’t think of any useful examples from film or literature that would give me any insight into the mentor’s journey, and which I could relate to and learn from. What becomes of the mentor? What do they do now?

I could think of many examples of mentor-mentee partnerships (the coupling of Yoda and Luke Skywalker has got to be one of my own personal favourites!) but they tend to focus on the mentee’s journey.

Luke Skywalker and Yoda

Luke Skywalker and Yoda

 

I thought a little longer… and came up with lots more brilliant mentor-mentee relationships: Frodo and Gandalf, Harry Potter and Albus Dumbledore, Daniel and Mr Miyagi, Jamal Wallace and William Forrester in the film Finding Forrester and Will Hunting and Dr Sean Maguire from Good Will Hunting. The scene where Sean (superbly played by Robin Williams) says to Will [about the abuse that he suffered when younger] that ‘it’s not your fault’ over and over again until Will breaks down sobbing has got to be one of my all-time favourite cinematic scenes.

Aside from Gandalf (whose own journey past death/into a higher state of consciousness – I haven’t quite figured that one out! – is witnessed) the focus is on the mentee. At the end of the mentee’s journey (which tends to be the length of the whole film or book) we often see that the mentor has had a life-changing experience – maybe this is the best way to explain what happens to Gandalf – although we don’t get to see what’s in store for them in their new life. We get a tantalizing glimpse that there is a new life ahead of them, although we don’t get to see much of what it looks like.

Then there are the mentee-mentor journeys which go either tragically (or simply horribly) wrong. I’m thinking of Dead Poets’ Society here, The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, Notes On A Scandal, even Emma by Jane Austen.

Then there are the Sith in Star Wars. How anyone embarking on a mentorship with a Sith (which is basically a mentoring of how to be evil) can think it won’t end up biting them on the bum is a fool. But of course we can’t help but be gripped by how it goes so badly wrong…

Again, these partnerships give fascinating insights into the power (and responsibility) held by the mentor, and how a mentee (and mentor) can be deeply affected by the relationship.

Something I learnt early on from my own mentoring experience is that the mentor and mentee have to be a good fit. I just can’t see how much use can come of a mentee-mentor relationship where both people aren’t attune with each other. (I wanted to use a quote here from Clarissa Pinkola Estes book Women Who Run With The Wolves but I can’t find it. If anyone knows the passage I’m talking about here, please do let me know!)

The word mentor comes from the name of a Greek mythological hero Μέντωρ, Méntōr, who mentored Telemachus. When I thought of the many mentor figures in literature, I could think of more examples of male mentors as oppose to female mentors, but of course being a mentor is not sex-specific. I love how it was actually the goddess Athena, disguised as Mentor, who inspired and counseled Telemachus to go in search of his father Odysseus.

Another interesting facet of being a mentor is that the mentor cannot be tied by blood to their mentee. Their relationship has to exist out of the sphere of the family… It has the potential to be broken (unlike blood ties that irrevocably bind us whether we want them to or not), which, I think, actually gives it its strength.

So… what do I do now? Of course I’m busy with family, work and my own creative pursuits, but a part of me still yearns to ‘give back’ by being a mentor.

I’ve noticed that mentoring schemes are also on the increase. I’ve heard great things from people involved with The WoMentoring Project (for women who write) and think the aims behind the following two organizations are fantastic: The Girls Network (“…a charity that matches girls from low socio-economic backgrounds with inspirational female mentors from all walks of life. [Their] mission is to raise aspirations and remove the barriers from our girls’ path to success.”) and The Wise Campaign (which aims to get more women into the sciences).

One day, time allowing (!), l may look into these so that I can continue to ‘give back’ by mentoring. Yet for the time being I am in an ‘interlude’. It feels disquieting and yet freeing too. I will await the next act.

 

p.s. All this referencing to Star Wars reminds me that I’m really looking forward to the next ‘act’ in the Star Wars saga!

p.p.s. Do let me know your own personal mentor-mentee relationships from books and films. I want to know. :-)

 

Thanks again to Amanda at WriteAlm for the inspiring writing prompts.

 

Wistful

I own this very old dictionary named Cassell’s Concise English Dictionary which is still very much loved and used by me.  It’s nowhere near as large as my Oxford Concise English Dictionary but I still like to look words up in it because it has so many beautiful archaic words in it.

Anyway… so its definition of wistful is this: Full of vague yearnings, sadly longing; pensive.

Which somehow captures my mood at the moment.

Recently, when out and about with the kids, I’ve really enjoyed seeing them making a fuss over a friendly cat in the street. It’s made me remember how much I used to adore cats when I was a kid too. And it makes me want to get another cat someday. Yet it’s still not the right time for us – more for practical and financial reasons rather than anything else, but of course I can’t help but remember our dear old chap Moggy, who died two years ago, round about this time. I still miss him, and of course I can’t help feeling wistful when I see how much joy a cat can bring to a human.

So here’s to you old chap, Moggy, our very own king of cats.

Moggy and the blue fabric by Marija Smits

Moggy and the blue fabric by Marija Smits

 

Thanks to Amanda over at WriteAlm for the continued writing prompts. Much appreciated.

 

 

Pencil, paper… bright ideas!

Welcome to the November 2014 Carnival of Natural Parenting: Indoor Play

This post was written for inclusion in the monthly Carnival of Natural Parenting hosted by Code Name: Mama and Hobo Mama. This month our participants have shared ideas and inspiration to keep families happy and healthy while cooped up indoors.

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Like many other mothers I love to create. I enjoy baking, painting, drawing, sewing, knitting, writing and gardening. The list is endless! However, since I gave birth to my first child seven years ago I’ve realized that many of those creative pursuits seem to be (or are) incompatible with the actual business of mothering.

Yet over the years I’ve also learnt how important it is for my own wellbeing to have a creative hobby. So, like many other mothers I’ve learnt how to find pockets of time for my own creativity. Some mothers find that they need quiet, solitary time to create. Naptimes and evening times work best for them. I certainly appreciate quiet for drawing and writing, but I can no longer always rely on sleep times now for my own creative pursuits. Which is why I like to get creative alongside my children during the day. By doing this, I can guarantee that I get a little time for creativity each day.

As painting and drawing is something that we all enjoy this is something that we all tend to do if we have one of those days when it’s so cold or windy outside that no one feels like braving the weather.

Two things I’ve learnt from my ‘art sessions’ (as I like to call them) is this:

1) ‘Messy’ art that has the potential to stain clothes, carpets and surfaces are probably best avoided if I don’t feel I have the patience (or energy) on that particular day to be philosophical about the mess. (And by the way, I’ve tried various covers, table cloths, floor covers etc. but my son is too much of a genius of the random splash to fall for any of my cunning protective paint traps!)

Likewise, an art activity that uses very expensive materials is most likely to cause me to worry about how much of that material each child is using, and so again, perhaps making the experience less fun for everyone!

2) Having too high expectations of how much I can get done alongside my children is almost always a recipe for an unhappy mother. I’ve found that starting the art session with a ‘let’s see what happens’ attitude is much better than an ‘I’m going to get at least this done, and then this, and this…’ attitude.

So what do we like to do? LOTS!

At the moment, we’re very much into simple pencil (or pen) and paper fun.

  • One of the easiest things to do is the (what we call) ‘one line’ game. Each person has an A4 (or A3) piece of paper which they draw just the one line on. The line can be curvy, or squiggly, or spiky, though it’s best if it goes right across the paper, from one end to the other. When each person has drawn their line they pass it to their partner who draws something incorporating that very first line. It can be a landscape, or a portrait, or a funny doodle, or a something else — just use your imagination! Once you’re both finished, show each other your works of art. You’ll be amazed at what’s been created from just one line!
RB 'One line art' mountain range

RB ‘One line art’ mountain range

 

MS 'One line art' face

MS ‘One line art’ face

 

  • Another family favourite is the ‘crazy dudes’ game. Again, each person has a piece of paper (portrait orientation works best for this) and you each draw a head in the top quarter of the piece of paper. You then fold the piece of paper over the head (so that your partner can’t see the head, but only the base of the neck) and then swap pieces of paper. Each person then adds a torso below the neck in what is, roughly, the second quarter of the piece of paper. Once you’ve drawn the torso, fold the piece of paper over the torso (so that no one can see what has been drawn before) and then swap again and then draw the legs from the base of the torso. Fold the piece of paper over the legs once you’re done with the leg drawing, swap pieces of paper and then finally, draw the feet. Once you’ve both done the feet, swap and open up each folded piece of paper so that you can admire the ‘crazy dude’ you’ve drawn!

[WARNING: this game can get addictive.]

 

Three 'crazy' dudes (drawn by all the family)

Three ‘crazy’ dudes (drawn by all the family)

 

  • Which brings me on to more collaborative fun. As I particularly like to draw faces I can quickly sketch a something which I then pass on to one of my children. They add the body and the surroundings and voila! a new being has been created.
'Swimming teacher in the garden' collaborative art by MS and 6 year old daughter RB

‘Swimming teacher in the garden’ collaborative art by MS and 6 year old daughter RB

 

MS + JB collaborative art

Collaborative art by MS and 4 year old son JB

For more inspiration on this theme, do check out this incredible post:

http://busymockingbird.com/2013/08/27/collaborating-with-a-4-year-old/

 

  • Origami fortune tellers are also a lot of fun.
Origami fortune teller

Origami fortune teller

Here’s a good link for how to make one:

http://handmadebyjt.blogspot.co.uk/2012/10/tutorial-origami-fortune-teller.html

But again, a warning — they can get rather addictive!

  • Then there’s the time-honoured ‘guess what I’m drawing’ game. Both kids like to snuggle up on either side of me and try to guess what I’m drawing. The first person to guess correctly what I’m drawing gets a point. And the first person to get to 5 points gets to be the next one who does the drawing. As we’re all quite attune to what we each like to draw from our imaginations (or surroundings) both guessers often guess the correct answer at the same time!
The drawing guessing game

The drawing guessing game. The object on the bottom right is a very old and deformed candle!

Willy Wonka's chocolate factory board game, by TCB

Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory board game, by TCB

 

So that’s just a small sample of the fun we have with pencil and paper (or magnetic sketching pad). However, once you bring in just one or two other items e.g. scissors and glue then you can start on all kinds of other fun arty paper crafts such as paper cutting or making collages from random bits of paper. (Cutting heads and bodies out of magazines and then adding your own drawings to them is really good fun too!).

  • I really like the idea of using up all the old paint swatches I have hanging around. I think this would make for a really fun project:

http://www.erindarcydesign.com/blog/rainbow-day-creations

(By the way — as you’d expect — my seven year old is more into paper crafts than my four year old who’s most happy with paper and pen, or paint. Actually, he loves glue, but the main game then becomes ‘what can I smear this on’!).

Of course we have days when we don’t just want to draw. Then we have lots of fun with paints or printing or marbling — all sorts! I’ve also gleaned a lot of ideas from the wonderful Amy over at Amy Hood Arts. Her e-zine ‘Art Together’ is inspirational!

The main thing is to have fun. I’ve been so inspired by just watching my children, and doodling alongside them. Their creations and their limitless imaginations feed mine; I always take away a whole bundle of ideas for future drawings/paintings after we’ve been having arty fun together. I’m sure that this stems from the fact that we have no great expectations, no fixed ideas on ‘how things should look’. The main emphasis is on play. And that’s how it should be.

Do let me know if you have any of your own favourite paper and pencil games — I’m always on the lookout for more!

“The creation of something new is not accomplished by the intellect, but by the play instinct arising from inner necessity. The creative mind plays with the object it loves.” — Carl Jung

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Carnival of Natural Parenting -- Hobo Mama and Code Name: MamaVisit Code Name: Mama and Hobo Mama to find out how you can participate in the next Carnival of Natural Parenting!
Please take time to read the submissions by the other carnival participants:

(This list will be updated by afternoon November 11 with all the carnival links.)